A Gift to News Anchor Kristin Anderson of My Fox 10 Phoenix news!

My mother-in-law won tickets to a tour and live taping of Fox 10 news here in Phoenix and invited us along!
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While there we were ecstatic to give news anchor Kristin Smith a gift of “The Prince and Timberance.”

Kristin has an infant son named Kingston who we hope will grow to enjoy this story as much as we do!

It was great being shown around the studio as well. Kristin is so down to earth and really has a connection with my son Tahj!

We thank her for the wonderful time, and my mother-in-law for bringing us. Hopefully in the not too distant future, we’ll be invited back to talk about our book “The Prince and Timberance”!

For now, we were happy to say hi to viewers and Tahj got to make his TV debut, live!

Thanks for dreaming with us!

Najat
#teamtimberance

New Promo Posters! “Who Is Behind the Face in the Cave?”

Look at these beauts!!!

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We ordered these from online and are very happy with the turnout! They are the perfect size for window displays.

We love how the slogan “Who is behind the face in the cave?” gets people talking! They’ll have to read and find out!

I’m really looking forward to future events and seeing these in stores.

As always, thanks for dreaming with us!

Najat

#TeamTimberance

Now Available at Barnes & Noble and BN.Com!

We are excited to announce that our title “The Prince and Timberance” is now available for special order at over 700 Barnes and Noble locations nationwide, and on bn.com!

We are moving steps closer to our ultimate goal of having our book gain national attention! We are prepping for our very first book tour and looking to have media exposure soon.

 

Thanks for joining us on this ride, and thank you for dreaming with us!

Najat

#TeamTimberance

Article Published on BlackandMarriedWithKids.Com!

We here at Enchanted Roots are grateful for the opportunity to share what we’re passionate about with the audience of BlackandMarriedWithKids.Com!

Read the article “Why I Read to My Infant Son” here.

 

Welcome to any new readers who’ve landed here at the blog by way of BlackandMarriedWithKids.com! Be sure to read our bio and learn more about our premiere title, “The Prince and Timberance.”

Thank you for dreaming with us!

Najat

#TeamTimberance

Myths Debunked about Fairy Tales Pt. 2

If you missed part 1, click here.

Myth #3: Fairy Tales are for Girls

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Fairy tales are HEAVILY marketed toward girls in the toy industry, there’s no denying that. But people fail to realize that the fairy tale genre existed eons and eons before television, toys, commercials and merchandising came around. Fairy tales from way back when were not synonymous with pink comforters and party favors; they were stories told to both MALE and FEMALE children. And fairy tales were not ONLY about “girly” things like true love and beauty personified.

Fairy tales often were a child’s first introduction to danger, tragedy, and triumph. Some of the more recent fairy tales are so good they are pegged more as children’s films-like Shrek. But remember Aladdin? What boy didn’t love the idea of envisioning themselves as the muscular hunk who was granted three wishes?

“The Prince and Timberance” is edifying PROOF that fairy tales are not just for girls. In “The Prince and Timberance” the story’s first character is the Prince. The story follows him in all of his princely glory, in his kingdom, and really gets the story going. Timberance, our heroine, is equal parts to this story, another important factor in breaking from the stigma of fairy tales.

“The Prince and Timberance” is truly a story that can be (and should be!) enjoyed by all. Young, old, boy, girl, white, black-there really is NO isolation when it comes to just WHO can enjoy this great, epic (yes, it is!) tale. :)

Myth #4: Fairy Tales promote damaging “happily ever afters” 

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A child’s heart soars when hearing these words at the conclusion of a happy ending, the icing on the cake. It echoes in the brains of children for years. Some of us are cognizant enough of the fact that these words can even be engraved in our  heads and turned into a mindset, a life goal. How many people do you know that have chased their “happily ever afters” only to wind up bitter and jaded?

As many modern parents have picked up on, sometimes children are prey to an ending that doesn’t set them up for the real world.

So is the solution to not have happy endings? Should we see Snow White years later pining away for the single life, or wishing to escape her kids? I wouldn’t say it has to be that extreme.

“The Prince and Timberance” has found a satisfying, authentic, and good-natured way to end the tale on a high-without leaving readers with a false impression that life begins once everything is declared “perfect.’

No fairy tale HAS to end this way, and ours doesn’t. See for yourself.

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All in all, it’s been fun debunking the myths of fairy tales that don’t apply to “The Prince and Timberance.” What are some other things that you think are common to most fairy tales? What do you like or dislike about the genre?

Leave a comment below. As always, thank you for dreaming with us. If you’re interested in purchasing the book, check out our purchase page.

-Najat

#TeamTimberance

Myths Debunked about Fairy Tales pt. 1

Here at Enchanted Roots, we have one thing on the brain: getting “The Prince and Timberance” in the hands of anyone who believes in good literature, and representation in literature, at the same time.

It just so happened that one of our first contributions to the world of children’s literature came in the form of the fairy tale. Interestingly enough, though this is a widely accessible genre, it is one where many stigmas are in place, and The Prince and Timberance stands to benefit from debunking some of the myths that come with the territory.

Myth #1: Fairytales are outdated

Any look on a publisher’s or literary agent’s web site will let you know one thing-fairy tales are “outdated.”

But wait, then what’s all this about?

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The famous Disney princesses can sell anything from band-aids to hours of playtime TODAY. Fairy tales are NOT outdated. They are embedded in today’s culture, and only have a risk of being “outdated” when new life isn’t allowed to be breathed into the genre.

With additions to the famous Disney lineup such as The Princess and the Frog, Tangled, and Brave, this genre isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.

Other children’s hits like Rugrats, or Peanuts, or Looney Tunes may come and then see its way into nostalgia, but the characters of fairy tales (up to now monopolized by Disney) definitely take up stock on bookshelves, DVD shelves, AND toy shelves of children today, everywhere.

Myth #2: Men do the saving, while women are forever helpless.

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Because many stories hold the prince responsible for saving the maiden or “damsel in distress” many people believe fairy tales promote the dependence of women on men.

While it is undeniably a pattern, even a genre like fairy tales have changed with the times. Take for recent examples, Disney’s Mulan and Brave.

 

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Add to the list The Prince and Timberance. While our story holds true to many of the fan favorites a fairy tale includes, like a magical spell and true love, in our story, the heroic moment is due thanks to action on Timberance’s part. She actually saves the prince-in more ways than one.

Ours is a story of epic proportions, a dream we can’t shake, and a fairy tale that deserves to come to life not only in book form, but in film. It will be a hallmark for the genre of fairy tales, and a lovely addition to any child’s library.

I can’t wait to hear from more people who have read the story and hear their take on the new tale. What’s stopping you from ordering your copy?

Thanks for dreaming with us!

-Najat

#TeamTimberance

 

What Readers Can Expect

The Prince and Timberance is currently available as a soft-cover book with illustrations. It has a table of contents, three substantial chapters, and accompanying glossary. The book is intended to be read by children ages 8-12, but it’s traditional narrative can be read aloud to children of all ages.

Readers are first introduced to the Prince. They find him in a fully formed African kingdom where he enjoys princely activities such as going for his morning swim in luxurious waters, hunting with the king’s warriors, and traveling to faraway lands with the queen’s merchants, all in royal fashion with a trusted servant by his side–some of you might find it hard to avoid images of Arsenio Hall as Eddie Murphy’s servant in “Coming to America”, but this is a different tale all together. The action begins to unfold quickly when the prince is given a magical gift after a chance meeting with a fading sorcerer. Receiving this gift places the prince in the path of a most vengeful and powerful sorceress, and causes him unimaginable strife. As is commonplace in fairy tales, a tragedy befalls him-but not without having a few enchanted friends to help ease his pain just a tad.

Next, readers are transported an entire world away where a young girl of African descent lives a humble life. Timberance quickly winds her way into the reader’s hearts, with her own story of abandonment at an early age and estrangement, though she harbors a warm heart and sweet disposition. Her disposition leads her to the extraordinary odds of the prince’s acquaintance, and readers discover two souls bound together by the truest of friendships.

Readers will delight in the noble prince, the charming Timberance, and memorable key players in the tale-including Eena, a powerful and beautiful villain. As the tale unfolds, readers are taken on a ride as they watch the story unfold with triumph over tragedy-tragedy that comes from the kind brought on by spells of evil magic doers, tragedy that can only be overcome by magic of the purest of hearts.

The Prince and Timberance is equal parts thrilling, mysterious, and magical and will surely be a welcome addition to any children’s book lover’s library.

*The story is 77 pages in length, and is encouraged to be read in portions aloud to children who cannot read on their own.

Illustrations are clip-art sized, black and white, and appear on roughly every other page. The glossary is a collection of words that are common but have somewhat of an old world feel to them-words such as “agonize,” “dwell”, “rave” and “woe”-appear with simple explanations to guide the young reader on their journey through the tale.

Visit Amazon to read excerpts, and order your copy today.

Thank you for dreaming with us!

-Najat

#TeamTimberance

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